Would you hang this painting in your home?

While visiting a museum, I have often wondered if I would like to have a painting I was looking at at home. This may seem like a somewhat hasty criterion for aesthetic judgment, but the relationship we have with art is certainly also mediated by the pleasure it gives us to look at it. So "having it in the house and being able to look at it" tells us how interested or attracted we feel by a work of art.

Giving an aesthetic judgment is still judging and art should be observed and then possibly explained, but the one we want in our home has a different aura: as for the furniture we choose and the quality of space, even the paintings we hang on the walls tell a part of our story and ourselves.

When I see my printed works, they look like they were made by someone else. That's right: they are objects that have a life of their own, regardless of who created them.

After creation, the relationship between the creator and his work takes on a different dimension and becomes almost that between two strangers. Or I could say it in another way: I don't know why I created a work in that way and not in another (it has no particular meaning for me) but I do know that when I see it as separate from me it poses questions.

I often look at something I've made wondering what it's saying to me and if it ultimately says something about me.

(Cover: “Ami 02” from the collection “Cells”)

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